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just getting a paycheck, you really don't understand how government can affect that firsthand. that was one of the things that led me to think this is a useful idea for a book. >> overall, philosophically, how do you see the role of government, the role of congress, the role of the president in the economy? >> basically this book raises and answers the question. we need government to create a stable environment for businesses to function and create jobs. when government battles too much in the economy, its policies are driven by politics and markets are driven by individuals and the real world music people. that's the difference between what government does about markets do. you need government to protect us from fraud, from wrongdoers. there are wrongdoers the government can protect us from them. overly meddlesome government goes to fire and you end up suppressing enterprise and innovation and job creation. >> 2008 financial situation and the so-called bailout. are you supportive of that government intervention? >> release the question and answer of the book basically. you ca
government will conduct a national test of the emergency alert system. >> you cannot avoid it. it is everywhere. john: does it make you feel safe the government spent 40 years studying the assault assault -- soap. do we need government to protect workers? >> absolutely. next? -- question. [laughter] >> good intentions and gone wrong. that is the show. tonight. john: politicians claimed they make life better to pass laws. they have good intentions but we should not judge by intention. politicians good intentions go wrong. work regulation. companies are not greedy they don't care about their workers but seems reasonable government has to protect them. almost everybody agrees. >> they should be protected. >> definitely. so many things could have been. corporations could be corrupt. the government should step been. john: that makes sense. so much beyond the workers' control. safety rules. what does a factory owner care? that is why we need occupational safety and health administration. it sets safety rules. they will show how the workplace deaths dropped since the beginning. thank
met by private groups or government, voluntary action or government action. the truth is, there has to be a balance between the two. government must ask for the common good while leaving private groups free to do the work only they can do. there is a vast middle ground between the government and the individual. our families and our neighborhoods. the groups we joined and the places of worship. this is where we live our lives. this is where the needs of each are most clearly recognized and met. our communities shape our character and give our lives direction. they help make us a self-governing people. the campaign of 2012 is filled with a lot of moments i will always remember. one of my favorites is the day bob talked about. it was to meet with people in cleveland, ohio. bobble brought them together. his center for neighborhood enterprise empowers communities. ryan's story will always stay with me. when he and his wife felt called to open a homeless shelterit is not enough to give food and shelter. people needed spiritual development. people need assistance to get on with their life.
are we now? 9:00 p.m. sunday. fox news. relive the dream dream again. >> the federal government will conduct a national test of the emergen alert system. >> you cannot avoid it. it is everywhere. john: does it make you feel safe the government spent 40 years studying the assault assault -- soap. do we need government to protect workers? >> absolutely. next? -- question. [laughter] >> good intentions and gone wrong. that is e show. tonight. john: politians claimed they make life better to pass laws. they have good intentions but we should not judge by intention. politicians good intentions go wrong. work regulation. companies are not greedy they don't care about their workers but seems reasonable government has tprotect them. almost everybody agrees. >> they should be protected. defitely. so many things could have been. corporations could be corrupt. the government should step been. john: that makes sense. so much beyond the workers' control. safety rules. what does a factory owner care? that is why we need occupational safety and health administration. it sets safety rul. they w
ways and very creative ways. and i want to say, again, as someone who has worked in government for 23 years, i've been at those departments like dpw and others where we think in one dimension. this is where we clean the streets. this is how often we clean it. this is when we tell the cars to move off. and this is what dpw does and it does it pretty well within that constraint. if you shared that data with companies who are looking at where do people live, how -- what their patterns are, we can get a lot more creative. when we open our data, when we suggest to departments that they can work in collaboration, when we open up and establish within our city contracts that the companies that do service for us do not own the data that they generate from us, that they will have a contractual obligation to share that with the city so that we can mine that to the rest of the city, that's advance of opportunities for everybody. i know at the heart of sharing this data, there is going to be a lot more jobs created, a lot more people out therein venting new ways to establish small businesses that
are the weaknesses to measuring how the government is doing in terms of being transparent? >> i agree that the strides being made in electronic folia - foia publication should go faster. the question i get all the time is why hasn't the white house engaged with congress on legislation to make federal spending more transparent. they have been -- the co mpttroller of the united states, the tech industry, and 23 open government groups saying we need legislation because federal spending data is not as trends. as it needs to be. information and should be published is not being published. why has the white house sent a deputy treasury secretary to capitol hill to testify against the legislation? the answer lies in the fact that making valuable data published in standardized always requires engagement with a substantive policy area. the opposition to be data at in the white house is being driven by the office of federal management. it is not that office's job to make sure things are published. i do not believe the white house leaders' working on open government data oppose what we -- white h
more efficient government, along with some very good entrepreneurial efforts that are reflected in today's announcements and some of our partners that are here today. so, three years later, after announcing this and after doing the first generation of open data legislation, open sf is still a very vigorous, and we want to do even more. we've teamed up again with board president david chiu who has been personally involved with this and helping us and guide us with his knowledge, having been a small business owner himself, with how we can do even better. and today we are announcing actually two areas of improvements to our piece of legislation that i think will get people even more excited. the first is after a couple of years of opening up some of the data streams in our city and seeing how this data had already started, some companies, some entrepreneurs develop applications, helped us already with identifying some additional needs in the city and involving more people, we want to do even more along that line. and, so, this legislation will allow us to establish, along with the
million americans receivinglet benefit, is it because government officials are constantly promoting it i am dave asbin. go in focus with victoria and rich and rick and john and, john why are food stamps going up if unemploymt is going down. >> the unemployment rate is high and that obcures a people who left the work force altogether that are not counted. as for politicians encouraging that, that is a horrifying notion . the idea of going on food stamps is something that should be s painful we only go on them a bef time so there is an incenti to go back if the work force. >> rick, you have all of the s and iear four of them every hour and government volunteers specifically going out to encourage people to get food stamps . there is it a big push to get people on food stamps. >> i don't think it is it promoting the food stamps but getting informatio to pple who need them so they know they are there to get the i think there is a lot taking place thate need to recognize. we have surprisingly good news on unemployment. there will be i lag for that anditching off food stamps d get back to work
of these are entrepreneurs who are not seeking special government leaders. the big banks, the goldman sachs of the world were all internet government and the government itself is mandating the purchase of these credit defaults on its and other devices which ended up bringing down the economy. it's not procapitalist to support goldman sachs and the internment embrace of the department of the treasury. >> is supply-side economics is quick >> surprise side economics is true economics. i actually am quite excited to have mitt romney running for president because they & co. was one of the providers of the foundation of supply-side economics. they apply to business. they showed the most effective way for businesses to gain share -- market share to cut their prices. we will cut prices that their business market share because costs are out by about 20 to 30% with each doubling of total units that were sold. the cost in general, economies of scope and scale of learning is called a learning curve. this is really the foundation of supply-side economics. why when you cut taxes, which are just like a prize, you reduce co
john: you look forward to going to school? >> yes. twenty-seven regular government schools get results because they are a government monopoly of almost always do a lousy job. up against the education blob that his job of the hunt teachers' union comment janitor union, bureaucrats they're resist change that is why -- while i was excited charters schools. schools could experiment the parents would see how much better it could be and kids would benefit from the innovation. it is not happening. sometimes. but the center for education reform says the charter movement has gone wrong. what happened is an example. >> my group have put together an application to start a charter school and we have been repeatedly stonewalled 57 because of your own daughter's experience you've got together with people and said we will start a charter. >> the first application was 100 pages could. denied. >> they said there was not a need we had typographical errors in the application. john: wouldn't mcdonald's like to say that to burger king? >> yes. john: you try again. >> we fixed them and we got more p
and regulation. but government encroaches everyday on people who want to start schools. john: the blob in charge they don't that competition state education department even the best states we have an of the highest performing traders goals and arizona the director spends 30% of the time filling out paperwork they tried to squeeze her school into a box. she has to report on the improvement plan. for what? john: i tried to make sure the kids are protected. >> but did her case are all kids reading at grade level? in no. math? no. qualified founders who have recognized something they want to do and we say don't come and? it is a movement people tried to get away from. >> i have resisted undid the union's teachers showed up shame on you. then they demanded i try teaching. >> you can teach for one week. john: the crowd like to the idea. so why surprise them to say sure. i was ready. but the blob did its thing and would not let that have been after endless meetings they decided i should not teach for one week like they embraced the soviet bureaucracy they don't care about the kids? >> i cannot imagine
>> i believe government is here to fix our streets, roads, and protect us, but they don't need to protect people from their jobs. >> three cheers for her. you at home who understand it's freedom, not central planning that gives us better lives, that's our show. thanks for watching, i'm john stossel. ♪ >> eric: watch the 5 nt week. >> the 5 p.m. or the show? thank for joining us. >> see you tomorrow. >> brenda: just as the unemployment rate is dropping, isapitol hill signaling tax heights are coming? add up the signs. a key conseative leaving the senate for the private sector epublicans reportedly cook up a doomsday plan that would give the president the tax hikes he wants. so if taxes goup, will jobs go down? hi, everyone, i'm brenda buttner, this is bulls and bears, let's get right to it. here they are, the bulls and bears this week. we've got gary b smith, tobin smith. and julian epstein, welcome to everybody. todd, if taxes go up, get ready for that unemployment rate to shoots u, too. >> you've got that right. brenda, not only going to go higher, we're looking at hundreds
on the tax. bottom line, the government takes it out of the system cutting and raising taxes and the small or deficit. that means that people are going to be out of work, almost by definition in the short run. but in the long run it's a healthier economy that doesn't go down the path of greece. if the long run greece would have low unemployment, but they do not, but yes, we're going to go a percent, if it happens the worse case scenario, but in five years we won't be not able to borrow money. >> brenda: julian, you can go ahead and respond. >> first of l, the ernst & young study has been debunked over and ov. and number two, the bush tax cuts, if you let the bh tax cuts. the crs study was a republican study and found the same thing as the cbo. if you let bush tax cuts expire on everybody, yes, you would have negative economic impact. the two staetudies done recentl shows the top two rates, top 2%, virtually no impact. to jonas' point if you raise taxes the lot and cut spending a lot and so austerity plan, that would have an impact. democrats were for pouring more money into the compli with
and europe are crashing on our shores? >> they are dumping product by having government subsidies to chien needs products that are often then subsidized so they can put you guys out of business on the entire market. that's what a lot of americans don't understand. it's frustrating to me. >> there is probably an even more important point about the product that is that our own government is making it more difficult for us to compete. >> how are they doing that? >> president obama is making the rounds. he is going to help us out by increasing our taxes. the only way we can beat governor is by investing in equipment. if the wage rates are lower in china and steel costs the same electricity costs the same the only way i can make business is to have better gimeequipment ane only way to have better equipment is to continually investment the only way to continually invest is make a profit. we are unable to invest in equipment capital accumulation increases wage growth decreases. >> there are a lot of big businesses that do okay. corporations are taxes at all. finding ways to be multi national. the
doing * . because with your help you are really making government better. so, i wanted to say thank you to the hatchery and everybody in this room. yo? (applause) >> thank you, thank you, mayor ed lee. thank you, phil ginsberg and the hatchery for hosting us. i use open data. our company was founded three years ago using open data. we are one of the first sustainable companies to use open data and be sustainable innovation, meaning we can generate revenue and keep mobile applications for government going. we are really excited to be here today. this is our official launch of apple-liscious. i would like to thank our team, kevin, rick robbins, moment of all [speaker not understood] for my cto and co-founder. this was a very long, long journey with the city, but we had the help of leaders like phil, mayor lee, jay driving behind the scenes, the efforts for business to work with government. and i think we've accomplished that with this unique partnership moving forward. we're excited now there's cross-department collaboration with the san francisco arts, with the san francisco public a
market share, which meets the lower cost and more prosperity. this is both for the government, which also administers price is. they are called taxes. so lower tax rates expand the economy and we need more revenues for the government and less zero-sum struggles over government favors. >> we been talking books tv but george gilder, author of several books with the new addition of george gilder, which came out originally in the early 80s. this is a tv on c-span 2. >> now i program from the up to the archives. fatima bhutto kameny said former pakistani prime minister, benazir bhutto, talks about growing up in a family powerbrokers. may suffer chronicles her close relatives including her own father who were assassinated by political. benazir bhutto was sworn in as prime minister of pakistan on december 2nd come in 1888. this is about an hour 15. >> back at home this evening. in the kitchen cooking at winning to my parents bedroom and sat as they watch television on the bed. he was a little child then in this so easy to take care of. we were lazily watching boston's ace, a show made in the 19t
people have chosen a divided government. it is up to us to make this divided government work. we have to set aside partisan concerns. how to work together to prepare this economy to get people back on their feet? how do we get this sense of real security and upper mobility for all americans, especially those in need? they are the same. the old ways will not do. we need new thinking and renewed efforts from all americans. it is true that president obama won reelection. i congratulate him on his victory. on january 20, he will face a stagnant economy and a fiscal mess. you might say he will inherit these problems. bft -- [laughter] in his second term, i hope he will offer fresh ideas. failure will mean four more years. we have work to do. i'm proud of our ecampaign. i'm proud of mitt romney. serious solutions for serious reforms, we thank him for doing that. the election did not go our way. the republican party cannot make excuses. we cannot have the next four years on the sidelines. we need to apply our timeless principles to the challenges of the day. our party excels at representing
government and the lloyd. this is about an hour. -- and deloitte. this is about an hour. >> good morning. i'm the head of bloomberg government. thank you for joining us today, and thank you to deloitte for partnering with us in this event. when we launched bloomberg government just about two years ago, we had the aspiration of creating a one-stop shop, with data, tools, news, and analysis to help government affairs and government sales professionals make better and faster decisions. we went a long way toward achieving that aspiration. a big part of it is conversations on the important issues that face our nation today, particularly at the intersection of business and government. today's discussion on the fiscal cliff clearly meets that. we are honored to have such a thoughtful panel. senator mark warner, senator bob corker, congressman chris van hollen, governor tim pawlenty, who is currently president and ceo of the financial services roundtable. moderating our discussion today is al hunt. we always love having al over here. he really put bloomberg on the map here in d.c. yesterday it was
heroic status. >> what we're hearing is the language of martyrdom. an elected government brought down by those who oppose it. it is a sign of just how polarized it has become. at the heart of the crisis is the president and his recent decree, giving himself immunity from judicial scrutiny. use the powers to rush through the constitution and call a referendum. tonight, thousands of opposition activists gathered outside the presidential palace. in a senior reminiscent of what happened when the bark -- mobaric was toppled. here they have their heroes and those they call martyrs, with the same at the keys asian -- the same accusation, that the revolution has been hijacked. >> he has put himself above the law. he has done everything to bring down his legitimacy. >> so a country that has once united against the dictatorship is now divided about how best to replace it. >> the unrest in egypt to the civil war that shows no signs of stopping in syria. today hillary clinton said the president's departure would be key to any transition. as efforts continue, so, too, does the blood shed on the gr
term. december 14th is the deadline for states to notify the government will plans setting up health care exchanges mandated by the affordable care act. republican governors who have been dragging their feet can no longer treat the reform law like a boogeyman that will disappear if they wish hard enough. because, if i may borrow a phrase from method man, when the american people elected president obama, they let you know it's real. yes, it's really real son. even the president's political nemesis, john boehner, knows that to be true. >> you had said next year that you would repeal the health care vote. that still your mission? >> i think the election changes that. it's pretty clear that the president was re-elected, obama care is the law of the land. >> now, of course, boehner promptly walked those comments back later that day. that doesn't make what he said any less of a fact. central to the implementation of that law is the creation of health care exchanges. now, let me explain. these aca exchanges are online marketplaces. in short, websites. the idea is to force insurance companie
it would be terrible. others predict tell actually be what this nation needs to begin to rein in government spending. will it? joining us is a former republican campaign manager and aide to the g.o.p. leadership. welcome. if this kicks in, in 23 days, will it be so dire or will it be the first step to budget reform? >> well, eric, i think the best thing that can happen for this nation in the long run is that we go over the fiscal cliff. will continue painful? yes, very painful. but i think that that is a pain -- it is only that pain that can hold these elected officials accountable and to act for responsibly. the reality is that, i have worked in in town 20 years, politics rules the day. the dose of reality, the pain, shut down of maybe -- shut down of the government services and operations. that type of pain, i think is the only thing that is going to, in the long run, get these folks in town to make sure this doesn't happen again and to act responsibly. as you said at the kickoff of this show, to really kind of look at these government programs and see if they are really necessary. >> you
-- the fcc, the agency of government created by congress to protect the public's rightful ownership of the airwaves -- is reportedly asking the other four commissioners to suspend the rule preventing a company from owning a newspaper and radio and tv stations in the same big city. thus he would give the massive media companies free rein to devour more of the competition. the chairman is julius genachowski, appointed to the job by president barack obama. now, the fcc tried to pull this same stunt under a republican chairman back in the second term of george w. bush, but at hearings held around the country an angry public fought back. >> we told you a year ago when you came to seattle that media consolidation is a patently bad idea. no "ifs," "ands," or "buts" about it. so with all due respect i ask you, what part of that didn't you understand? >> i'm a republican and i'm a capitalist, but some areas of our private sector must be regulated. freedom of information is too important, we must be proactive in protecting that fundamental freedom. >> if the fcc is here wanting to know if chi
, it will be difficult to convince the u.s. government to change the way it has done business over the last 30 years -- some of that is necessary. the task is, how do you play the right role of engaging here? it is not naively giving money to liberal groups and not having a strategy. i believe this is a significant task inside egypt. it is an encouraging sign -- this is my prediction, it is going to force islamist political parties, at least elements of it to change their ideology. if the system remains open, if there is a big debate, i did not see it going backwards in terms of the diversity in egypt. it is hard for me to imagine that going backwards. >> we're going to move toward closing remarks. we will go in reverse order. bret you can have your two minutes. >> 1979, an influential article was written, dictatorships and double standards. he argued -- in a position of find myself increasingly attracted to -- the united states is better served secular authoritarian regimes against totalitarian alternatives. totalitarian alternatives, then as now, often becomes a power by means of democratic or pop
bigger bills and government control. neil: can't they throw a bone to republicans, offer you at the gate, $800 billion in tax hikes? couldn't you throw it back at them, first thing offered, doubling the tax hikes, $1.6 trillion. a clumsy start from the get-go, but i don't see any proposals to match, not the republicans spelled out they get the hikes, but to match the effort to raise taxes. >> well, look, atthe end of the day, this is the theater they put down the marker, no way, no how will we compromise, and the other says no way, no how will we compromise. at the end of the day, they compromise. thee have no choice. what you'll see is ceain lines in the sand that the president said he will not accept. he will not accept a deal that does no include tax hikes on the wealthy. at the same time, he understands that in order to get th, he has to give the republicans something they want. by the way, the same republicans who ran a campaign with president obama cutting $716 billion out of medicare, all the sudden want tremendous cuts in medicare. i think we'll get a deal. we have to. i think th
with the ongoing crisis in syria where the assad government is cracking down on its own people. and this week something significant happened. the president signalled a big potential shift in u.s. involvement there. here's what he said. >> i want to make it absolutely clear to assad and those under his command, the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons, there will be consequences, and you will be held accountable. >> nbc chief foreign correspondent richard engel is in syria to bring us the latest on what is a developing story. richard? >> reporter: david, despite increasing criticism and warnings, the government of bashir al assad is revving up its activities. this area was bombed last night. regarding chemical weapons, commanders we have spoken to are very concerned that the government could use chemical weapons. they are completely not prepared for that eventuality. they don't have gas masks. they don't have medicine. there's no early warning system here. they have appealed for some kind
will require islamists when exposed to the public, will force and to pay the heavy price of governing. in egypt we see that already. much in the same way that in the next couple of weeks in this town we will see some ideologues, see their ideology tested. grover norquist -- both ways. political forces, wherever their ideology is grounded, as long as the system remains open tand pluralistic, but will be forced -- we see this in indonesia. in 2002, the islamist parties got 41% of the vote. the decline over the last couple of years to about 29%. i believe we are in the early stages of transformation in the middle east. we will talk about that complex competition for power. a final point -- i hope we debated a little bit. it is the issue of u.s. policy. it is my view that two years into this transition in the middle east -- and i avoid calling it arab awakening or arab spring. it is too early to characterize it. we've only seen about four countries, senior leaderships' change. -- seen their leadership's change. how we actually change and adapt and become more nimble, both in terms of how we deal wi
should be released because he never should have been detained. >> but the castro government says five of its spies in the u.s. must be released first. >> the united states government refuses with the cuban government to achieve a solution. >> when senator cardinal was asked about that on cbs. >> they're totally different cases. what cuba has to do is release alan gross. >> that doesn't mean they can't sit down and try and talk again and again and try until they reach something. >> what might break the stalemate is the end of the presidential campaign. mr. obama carried florida's cuban america vote. they want the white house to take it. >> the administration has been visited by us to make it clear that this needs to be a high priority. we got to get alan gross back. >> alan gross is 63 years old and his family says he has health problems. he is serving a 15 year prison sentence. >> thanks so much. those five cubans were arrested in the u.s. in 1998. the castro government admits they were spying, but refers to them as heros. >>> anti-apartheid icon
to small city governments, county governments doing local research to document, his goal was to document every single person executed in this country. one of the persons that espy piled information on was the youngest person to be executed in the united states in the 20th century. and if you think about the history of capital punishment, some themes draw out. one of the themes is the execution of children. this has been debated, and ideas and perspectives have been given on this, is it right to execute children. another theme is, is it proper to execute people who are mentally ill? another issue that is drawn out in the history of capital punishment is the factor of race in determining sentencing of capital punishment. it's been statistically proven by david ball discuss and others that race is a mitigating factor in capital punishment sentencing. so these themes of race, of executing the young, executing the mentally ill are some of the themes that you can draw out of the collection. so here we have george stinney. george was 14 years old when he was convicted of killing an 11-year-old
laissez-faire to a powerful market governance in the public interest. from dishonest prices to honest ones, from commodification to protection of the commons. in the corporation from shareholder primacy to stakeholder primacy. from one ownership and motivational model to new business models involving alternative forms of ownership and to the democratization of capital. in money and finance from wall street the main street, from money created through bank debt to money created by government. in economic growth from today's growth fetish to postgrowth society from mere gdp growth to growth in human welfare and in democratically-determined priorities. in social conditions from economic insecurity to security for vast inequities to fundamental fairnesses from joblessness to good jobs for all who seek them. in indicators from gdp, grossly distorted picture, to accurate measures of social and environmental health and the quality of life. in consumerism from consumerism and influenza to sufficiency and mindful consumption, from more to enough, from owning to sharing. in communities from runaway e
liberty protects the person from unwarranted government intrusions and freedom extends beyond spatial bounds, liberty presumes an autonomy of self-that includes freedom of thought, belief and expression. that certain intimate conduct the defendants are adults and their ability to declare the issue as one related to the right of engaging in certain sexual conduct de means the claim the claimant brought forward. what a story. joining me now, chad griffin and gay rights advocate, elizabeth bench. i hope i set it up the best i can. i can't write the majority opinion next year. your thoughts? >> i couldn't have said it better. it is an incredible day the supreme court is taking the prop 8 case as well as the doma case. when this case was filed almost four years ago, the prop 8 case, we made the case in court. in this country, we don't deny our citizens a fundamental right. the supreme court has called marriage a fundamental right no less than 14 times in this country. i'm optimistic once the court hears this doma case they will come down on freedom and libberality as they have. >> elizabet
scale. that is one data set. to your other question about what is the federal government doing, we're seeking not just an energy, but across the government to engage entrepreneurs and innovators across all the different sectors. for those of you familiar with the history of the health data initiative launched by then the hhs health and human services chief technology officer todd park, we sought to have a health data palooza proceeded by health data jambs or modeling sessions, jams sounded more fun, we can invite entrepreneurs in and see what can be done and created real products within a few months. that is being rolled out at education, energy, treasury, u.s. aid, other agencies as well. these programs are celebrating the use of open data and hopefully will provide some additional support. i think there are even folks here who have been part of these events. we're excited for that continued support and hope you can all join this initiative in the neutral. -- future. >> so, earlier you were talking a little about kind of how san francisco came in in terms of actually ading the off
secretary of the treasury, alexander hamilton, observe energy is a leading character in good government. the president must lead in a divided government and must not advocate his or her responsibility. president obama has the responsibility to propose a real bipartisan plan to avert the fiscal cliff that can pass both the house and the senate. withdrawing from the recommendations of the simpson- bowles commission, the president could propose a plan that would not only avert the so-called fiscal cliff, but also help us avert the fiscal abyss. if president obama were to offer such a plan, republicans would act favorably. going over the cliff is unnecessary. as it has been observed in "the wall street journal," the president is boxing in the republicans. he is offering them a deal they cannot accept. first, the president has repeatedly called for a balanced solution involving both revenue and less spending. what is obvious to the most casual observer is that this plan is not a balanced. the fiscal cliff involves nearly four dollars of anticipated revenue from higher taxes for every dollar
to that position which hadn't existed before in the united states government, assistance secretary of the navy. >> there had been something called a chief clerk for years, but the idea of having an assistant secretary, what would be the point of that? there's nothing for him to do. and the job of chief clerk had already been promised elsewhere, and lincoln was told, but we can't -- >> but o do you assessment of naval commanders in chief. >> i believe both secretaries of the navy were very competent, and i would disagree they had little experience. i think being a salvage lawyer in key west and chairman of the naval committee was a lot of experience for mallory, and gideon welles had a lot of experience, the navy at the time was administered by a series of bureaus, steam engineering and so forth. and he was the bureau of clothing and provisions. which means he was the logistics guy for the navy. he was the only civilian to have that guy. everybody else was a navy captain. it would be like having somebody on the joint chiefs of staff who was in a civilian suit. so he really did have some experie
doesn't save the government a penny, it takes that and spends it on other people. what -- it's really important that people look. the government is twice the size it was 11 years ago, we have seen the president demand that we're going to solve 7% of this problem but he's totally inflexible on the other 93%. it doesn't matter what happens at the end of this year, because ultimately, the numbers and the bond holders throughout the world will determine what we'll spend and what we won't. we can play the political game that is being played out in washington right now. or we could actually be absolutely honest with the american people, social security bankrupt in two years, social security trust fund will be bankrupt in five years, social security total will be bankrupt in probably 16, 17 years. those are worst-case scenarios by the trustees of both those organizations. we can play those games. but the fact is, we're spending money that we don't have on things that we don't absolutely need and there's no grown-ups in washington that will say time-out, stop the politics, let's have a compro
of the republican party is a party that understands that limited government, limited government and free markets is not enough. that we have to have a message to say, how does that work for you? and that's why we put together specific policies that did in fact and free market policies that did in fact address lower and middle income americans. if we don't do that and go out and say, here's how -- for example, barack obama sort of stepped on it when he said you didn't build that. mitt romney went out and legitimately criticized for him but went out with a bunch of small business people and not so small business people. we could have gone out there with the people who work for the small business person. the person who knows the owner of that business and says we built this together. here's how this helps -- here's what these policies help me. and i don't think we did that -- i know we didn't do that. we didn't even try to do that. that's what we tried to do in our race. and i'm certainly going to be out there and have been out there already. i wrote an op-ed after the election for "usa today", it'
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